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#6 October 2016

Our last event of 2016!

Coincidently our final event of 2016 also has an all-female line up! This time we're focusing on the arts and humanities:

Karen Patel is a PhD Student at Birmingham City University in the Birmingham Centre for Media and Cultural Research and her PubhD talk will focus on her research into cultural work, social media and expertise: the experiences of female artists:

"Social media and art and craft seller websites such as Etsy allow anyone to create and sell art and potentially make money from it. This has raised questions about the legitimacy of amateur art and its impact on ‘professional’ artists. I explore this by looking at how a group of UK female artists, working from home, use social media to perform expertise. Drawing from my qualitative analysis of their social media posts, I argue that the concept of expertise can be a useful analytical tool for helping us to understand cultural production in the social media age, including the ways female cultural workers mobilise online to not only benefit their own careers, but benefit each other.."

Karlyn King is based at the University of Birmingham will be talking about her research on vinyl records vs digital ephemera:

"My work is an ethnomusicology study into how the music consumer experiences music on different objective formats. Does the medium of music matter? What is the nature of artistic exchange when a consumer experiences music on each format? How is the music business going to move forward with this knowledge?"

Renata Del Rio Meints Adail is a PhD Student in English Literature at the University of Birmingham researching the writing of James Joyce:

"The focus of my thesis is to investigate the presence of Milton in Joyce's writing. In this specific talk, I am going to expand on how Milton's Satan has contributed to Joyce's building of his main character, Stephen Dedalus. Through the use of verbal echoes and the archetype of the fallen angel, Joyce shows a cooperative and even friendly relationship with Milton's writing, inviting an investigation of his work as having been more than 'influenced' by Milton's."

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